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Why Do Women Filmmakers Create Film Festivals? (podcast)

Kate Kaminski applies stage blood during filming of 2020
© Judy Beedle Photography
Why do women filmmakers create film festivals? In this podcast Kate Kaminski (Bluestocking Series in Maine, the only women's festival in the world where the primary criterion is that the films pass the Bechdel Test) and Briony Kidd (A Stranger With My Face Horror Festival in Hobart) talk about their motivations and aims, the relationships between their filmmaking and their festival-making and about the role of the Bechdel Test in their festivals. I was fascinated by their differences and similarities. Warm thanks to them both.

Podcast 60mins

LINKS & NOTES

The Festivals

Bluestocking Series
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Stranger With My Face
Facebook Twitter

The Filmmakers

Briony Kidd
Briony Kidd
Twitter
Room at the Top of the Stairs
Facebook


Sam and Piccolo written by Briony Kidd, directed by Adam Walker

Kate Kaminski
Twitter
Gitgo Films
Facebook
Willard Beach a 53-episode sitcom webseries (3 minutes per episode)
Gitgo Films trailers
Great interview at HerFilm

Rebecca Thomson
Twitter
Trailer for Rebecca Thomson's Cupcake: Zombie Lesbian Musical





The Bechdel Test
via the legendary Anita Sarkeesian at Feminist Frequency, who is one of the Bluestocking Series' selectors.





Why film schools teach screenwriters not to pass the Bechdel Test, by Jennifer Kesler

Viscera: Celebrating Female Genre Filmmakers

Women and Hollywood on women's film festivals

Women's film festival bibliography

Cornelia Walter's 'Absolutely Not Obsolete Women’s Film Festivals Are Still Not an Anachronism – Sadly' (p32)

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